RiverWordsounds

because the future never goes out of style

279,874 notes

clitterly:

emilyvgordon:

shepherdsongs:

I was driving past a business here in the Houston Heights, when I glimpsed this painted on the side of the building. I recognized that iconic WWII poster before I realized it was not just any woman, but 14 year old Malala Yousafzai, the Pakistani girl who was attacked for wanting an education. The words next to her are her quote, ( “I don’t mind if I have to sit on the floor at school.) All I want is education. And I’m afraid of no one.”

This is gorgeous.

yes

clitterly:

emilyvgordon:

shepherdsongs:

I was driving past a business here in the Houston Heights, when I glimpsed this painted on the side of the building. I recognized that iconic WWII poster before I realized it was not just any woman, but 14 year old Malala Yousafzai, the Pakistani girl who was attacked for wanting an education. The words next to her are her quote, ( “I don’t mind if I have to sit on the floor at school.) All I want is education. And I’m afraid of no one.”

This is gorgeous.

yes

(via justlikearootlessfuckyou)

370 notes

nymphoninjas:


I’ve been thinking a lot lately about bodies, nudity, and photography (more so than usual for someone who spends a lot of time there already, that is). This most recent musing is inspired in part by the amazing and new-to-me work of photographer Fred Huening (http://fredhuening.de). In the process of documenting the life of his family, Huening’s work incorporates nudity—and even sexuality—in a straightforward, matter-of-fact way that both elevates it and normalizes it. Bodies are simply bodies and sex is simply sex, no matter our personal or cultural hang-ups around both. And sometimes pretty pictures include body parts or sexual activity and are—despite said hangups—not really different than other pretty pictures.  This is a mindset that I think Nymphoninjas helps encourage, so thank you for providing a forum for that. (And yay!, I was so excited to hear that my friend ESD is involved in this week’s SS. Her work is a continuous inspiration to me, and she has impeccable taste in photography.)
- Andrew/Alveoli Photography (http://alveoliphotography.tumblr.com)

I took a look at Fred’s work, it reminds me very much of the way you seem to capture things so naturally. You have a way with that also. There’s an effortlessness to yours photos and it makes them so…real. I don’t know how else to explain it. It makes nudity seem natural, normal; not dirty. This is the way I view nudity and nude photos of course, but it gives me hope that people who are exposed to your work and work like Fred’s can perhaps open their minds a bit and realize this is just a part of life. Sex is just a part of life just as much as nudity is, and sadly both are so demonized by a lot of people and it causes all sorts of unnecessary discomfort. They are no different than any other pretty picture, like you’ve said. 
I could go on, but now about your photo. Perhaps because you are outside, in water, this photo also comes across as just so natural. It’s just you, in a moment. And it’s lovely. My favorite part is that your nudity is almost an afterthought because of that. My eye sees so many other things before I even register that you are naked. You really truly know how to capture the naked body and how it means so much more that just being without clothes. Thank you so much for your kind words, you know I admire you very much and am always inspired by your work. I’m honored to be able to write this up for one of your photos. -ESD

nymphoninjas:

I’ve been thinking a lot lately about bodies, nudity, and photography (more so than usual for someone who spends a lot of time there already, that is). This most recent musing is inspired in part by the amazing and new-to-me work of photographer Fred Huening (http://fredhuening.de). In the process of documenting the life of his family, Huening’s work incorporates nudity—and even sexuality—in a straightforward, matter-of-fact way that both elevates it and normalizes it. Bodies are simply bodies and sex is simply sex, no matter our personal or cultural hang-ups around both. And sometimes pretty pictures include body parts or sexual activity and are—despite said hangups—not really different than other pretty pictures.
This is a mindset that I think Nymphoninjas helps encourage, so thank you for providing a forum for that.

(And yay!, I was so excited to hear that my friend ESD is involved in this week’s SS. Her work is a continuous inspiration to me, and she has impeccable taste in photography.)

- Andrew/Alveoli Photography (http://alveoliphotography.tumblr.com)

I took a look at Fred’s work, it reminds me very much of the way you seem to capture things so naturally. You have a way with that also. There’s an effortlessness to yours photos and it makes them so…real. I don’t know how else to explain it. It makes nudity seem natural, normal; not dirty. This is the way I view nudity and nude photos of course, but it gives me hope that people who are exposed to your work and work like Fred’s can perhaps open their minds a bit and realize this is just a part of life. Sex is just a part of life just as much as nudity is, and sadly both are so demonized by a lot of people and it causes all sorts of unnecessary discomfort. They are no different than any other pretty picture, like you’ve said. 

I could go on, but now about your photo. Perhaps because you are outside, in water, this photo also comes across as just so natural. It’s just you, in a moment. And it’s lovely. My favorite part is that your nudity is almost an afterthought because of that. My eye sees so many other things before I even register that you are naked. You really truly know how to capture the naked body and how it means so much more that just being without clothes. Thank you so much for your kind words, you know I admire you very much and am always inspired by your work. I’m honored to be able to write this up for one of your photos. -ESD

(Source: nymphoninjas, via socalyoungnaturist)